RHETORIC in DESIGN -issues for design -16

Post 653 -by Gautam Shah

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Rhetoric is the ‘art of speaking or writing effectively’. (Webster’s Definition) Aristotle describes it as ‘the ability or means of persuasion’. He describes three forms of rhetoric: Ethos (distinctive spirit of a people or an era), Logos (the logic and supportive evidence behind an argument or a reasoned discourse), and Pathos (represents an appeal to the emotions of the audience, and elicits feelings that already resides in them). Rhetoric is used in literary and verbal expressions, by using things that are familiar, but less acknowledged in common usage. In literary and verbal expressions rhetoric is exploited by construction (of the language form) and reinforced through the means of delivery such as rendering diction and graphics.

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Literary and verbal expressions generate instant and consistent impression over their audience or followers. Designed objects like arts, crafts, architecture, graphics, products, etc. however, do not carry an immediate or intense message of persuasion. A design has a persistent delivery, but very variable in content. It gets actualized in many different scenarios.

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Emotions through rhetoric ‘have specific causes and effects’ (Aristotle -book 2.1.2–3). Such dialogues however, do not exist between designers and connoisseurs. ‘Aristotle posits that along with the pathos (an appeal to the emotions of the audience), a speaker must also deploy good ethos (distinctive spirit of a people or an era) in order to establish credibility’. Philo distinguishes between two different types of logos 1 Prophorikos (the uttered word) and 2 Endiathetos (the word remaining within). In case of design-objects, the later one is relevant, as the rhetoric of design is always latent or potential.

640px-Henri_Rousseau_(French)_-_A_Centennial_of_Independence_-_Google_Art_ProjectRhetoric is means of expression or conveyance. In Literature and utterances it gets reinforced through linkages or examples, and altered through feedback from the audience. Such immediate response is not possible for Art, craft or architecture, and if any, it arrives as feed-forward in the make up (training and experience) of the creator. The design feed-forward chiefly relies on the visual rhetoric like books, site visits, media images, etc. But, it is impossible to perceive here ‘one cause to one effect pattern’. Other sensorial inputs like touch, smell, taste, aural, etc., historically had alogical legitimacy. Once a design actualizes, the feedbacks may arrive as historical realizations, but in different time and context. So designs can ‘have traceable past, but uncertain future.

Interior_of_a_revolving_space_station_(artwork)

It is often claimed that visual literacy is of recent origin, when we ignore the mediums of expression and conveyance, which have been with us since primitive age. Wall murals’ images were visual rhetoric, well ‘read’ and capable of arousing Aristotelian pathos (an appeal to the emotions of the audience). Some examples of visual means are charts, graphs, diagrams, photographs, movies, printed media, etc. but though these arouse the pathos but not always as instant response.

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Visual Literacy

The study of visual rhetoric is different from that of visual or graphic design, in that it emphasizes images as sensory expressions of cultural meaning, as opposed to purely aesthetic consideration. (Kress, Gunther, and Theo van Leeuwen. Reading Images: The Grammar of Visual Design. New York: Routledge, 1996.).

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The Design objects like architecture poses a statement only after their making, or on being used as an ‘artifact. Vitruvius stated that a work of architecture is a matter of ‘invention, arrangement, memory, delivery, and style’, and the process was perceived to be similar, to the Aristotelian way of putting together a speech. Design creation is very circumstantial, meant for a client, functions, site, regulatory framework, financial restraints, etc. It, however, needs to be tempered by arrangement, assimilation or composition of many different elements and considerations. These, together offer a holistic character, but realizable only after the creation. Rhetoric in design, if any, is in the design feed-forward, and after its avatar through the feedback. The feed back spreads over a very long period, sometimes after the original entity is destroyed. The Aristotelian depiction of Rhetoric as ‘the ability or means of persuasion’, for designed objects like architecture remains vague or conjectural.

Bidri_craft,_craftmen_at_work

The ability or means of persuasion were reasonable for artefacts conceived and made by the same person. But modern designers generate designs through surrogates or representations, and transmitted to makers or assemblers as schema or specifications. The communication through a schema is an order for execution, but certainly not for persuasion or concurrence. The instructions, if, any are non-personal and distanced in time. Some designs are too involved with the clients or stake-holders, but many others are panoptic. Designers are self-absorbed to care for persuasion or confirmation of anyone. Rhetoric exists, but as statement of non-confirmation.

Deconstruction Ways by Isidro Blasco

Design disciplines are categorized in four major domains: Graphic Design (Real and abstract -symbols communication), Products Design (objects, artefacts, craft-items), Services Design (software, interaction, stake holders) and Empathetic Design (social concerns).

McKeon, Buchanan state the understanding of design, as of symbols and images1, physical artifacts2, actions and activities3, and environments or systems4.

Architecture Confluence Lyon Deconstruction

Build-Designs are perceived at Two levels. First level consists of assembly of elements like signs, patterns, or images, and the organizational discipline. At another level, there is holistic form that is conceived without any elemental identities.

Kirtimukha_sculptures_on_shikhara_(tower)_of_Amrutesvara_temple_at_AmruthapuraThere are few characteristics common to both the congregated and totalitarian forms. Design, in part or as a whole is an allusion to something separated in time and space, and formed through analogy (comparison) or antithesis (contrast). Antiphrasis is an impressionistic expression to convey non-conventional meaning used for sarcasm. Build-forms or the constituents are given magniloquence by way of exaggerated scale, contrasts, precarious shape and intensive vibrancy.

Bilbao,_Euskal_Herria_-_panoramio_(1)

There are few features that rhetorize composite forms due to multiplicity of constituents elements. The sub-elements occur as microcosm, recurrence, as directional move, evolution-devolution and support-contrast. These rhetoric elements manifest in scaling, sequencing or within a perceptible domain of time or spatial reference.

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Design objects like architecture, fashion, products, are created for stake-holders and for personal gratification. Objects for personal gratification often result from intense desire to go out of the box as a non-conformal creative activity. This attitude, though very radical, resulting into unusual approaches and solutions, is tied to reality. All worldly creations are governed by factors like gravity, terrain and environment. Arguments of persuasion, justification or acceptance.

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Out of the Box thinking: It is believed, the term for unconventional perspective in thinking, has come from British mathematician Henry Ernest Dudeney. In this, nine dots are to be interconnected by using four lines drawn without the pencil leaving the paper. The puzzle required one to go beyond the dot array boundaries that is move out of the box.

9Dot puzzle

 

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This is the 16 th article of 20 topics series on ISSUES for DESIGN

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MEANING of CRAFTS -5 -TOOLS

Post 651 -by Gautam Shah

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Villeneuve_d'Ascq_Eté2016_Asnapio_(35)

Tools are implements used by a person in manual operations for production or processing, like manipulation materials, craft-work, building construction, cultivation, food processing, offense-defence, handling, carriage, measurement and expression (writing, drawing, enacting). Tools have been used for making better tools. Tools are for doings things in an easier manner, as well as for doings things that otherwise would not have been possible by hands. There are few conditions where instead of the tools, the supports and other facilitatory structures and arrangements help in creative efforts and productivity.

Stone Age Caveman Ancestor Hunting Neanderthal

Tools are universal implements, used over different tasks and materials. Over a time, though, an exclusive manner of handling develops. The manner of handling evolves a holding mechanism. The holding mechanism, an entity integral with the tool, allowed efficient use of the tool. The combination of a tool and its handling mechanism was a task (and material) specific facility. The tools and handling section, each served different purposes, and so were shaped accordingly. Both faced different stresses and required different composition. But a combination of diverse forms and materials need to be compatible, coordinated and well joined.

Stone_tools_from_Jebel_Irhoud

 

Handled tools extend and modify the reach of the body. The extended reach helps remote access, adds to leverage and allows torque or twisting. For cutting, breaking, beating, copping and such other jobs need leverage for impact or percussive forces.

Stone Age Tomahawk Blue Archaic Close Hoe Sky

A lever amplifies an input force to provide a greater output force. The lever arm is defined as the perpendicular distance from the axis of rotation to the line of action of the force.

Recognizing objects that can work more efficiently was the first craft. Refining by reshaping natural objects for a specific purpose has been one of the oldest craft industries. Some of the basic craft tools were for food preparation, and personal safety and security. Early tools were fragile and often got consumed in the use-processes. And so, the search for new tools was everlasting, alternatively new tools had to be fashioned from old ones. Redefining the tools necessitated search for better materials, sharpening the edge, and tying a handle.

640px-Adzes_from_New_GuineaTools were now of three basic classes: hand-held tools, percussive tools and projectiles. Other sub-classes were like cutting, scrapping, hole making, vessels, holding, measuring, coating-spreading, digging, mixing, etc.

Haljesta

Primary tool materials were stones, woods, bones, clays and perhaps metals. Some of these could be re-formed by downsizing. Clay and metals were plastic materials that could be re-formed by moulding and additive process.

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Holding tools became important for two main purposes, to hold fine-sized objects and tools and to hold fire or hot things. Fine items like beads, and precious-stones need to be held properly to work upon them. Tool bits like fine and fragile edges need support, whereas fine points for drilling and engravings require adequate gripping. Tools were required to initiate, and work with fire. These included fire-fuel management utilities (chulhas), air blowers, handle for hot tools and holders for vessels. Agriculture related tools like thresher boards, winnowing baskets, sieves, land tillers, etc. Spinning, knitting, and weaving utilities developed for threads and cordage, which were used for binding handles, roof and wall elements, fishing nets, etc.

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Tools, as said earlier, are handy things. But there are many utilities, facilitatory structures and arrangements that have helped creative efforts and productivity. In these, at certain level of detail tools like appendages or similar advantages are invested. One of the first ones was the fireplace that contained the fire, helped efficient use of the fuel and offered resting stands for things to be heated. Similarly structures were created as dwelling spaces, clothes or apparel, shoes, head caps, adornments, toys, totems, murals, shutter systems over openings, hangers for food to protect it from insects and rodents, sleeping mats, hammocks and cradles, lamps that evolved less heat but more light, food grinding stones, narrow neck pitchers for liquid storage, slide for transporting goods, etc.

640px-Göbekli_Tepe,_Urfa

At some level the tools, utilities, facilitatory structures and arrangements were merged as devices, machines, apparatuses, equipments or plants. These were integrated with the built-forms, for support, location-based advantage or task setting. The tool, craft and technology were one seamless pursuit. The pursuit also integrated several materials into not only single purpose entities but very specialized task facilities. The task related specializations also created technology-based castes, guilds and communities. The craft communities are tied to terrains and climates. This allows them to develop acutely ethnic styles.

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COPPER -1

Post 477 –by Gautam Shah

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Pure copper nodule 40 mm across

Copper resources of the world are estimated at nearly 5.8 trillion pounds. Of these only about 0.7 trillion pounds have been mined to date. The recycling and recovery rates of copper are so high that of nearly all of the copper mined throughout history, is still in circulation today. This means nearly 80 % of all copper ever mined is still in use today.

Malachite, Zaire> Uploaded by JJ Harrison

Copper was discovered by prehistoric man, in search of shiny stones that when beaten did not break down but rather flattened out. This was sensational discovery leading to search of shiny nodules across lands. Pure Gold and Copper nodules were forged into items of adornments and tools. It was known that several nodules of such pure metals could be forged to form a larger piece. Such nodule findings were rare. But two forms of copper carbonates greenish malachite and bluish azurite were easy to identify and collect from the grounds. Malachite was also used as a gemstone. Similarly many other bright minerals were identified.

Neoclassical vase in malachite in the Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg Uploaded by Dezidor

Azurite 80 x 60 mm Azuritechessy.jpg Uploaded by Archaeodontosaurus

Copper was known around 10000 BC or even earlier. Earliest copper object, a pendant dating 8700 BC, was found Iraq. Copper, in natural nodules form, remained a prized material for a while, but soon became a metal of utility. Unalloyed copper is soft for tools and weapons, but fairly suitable for shaping of utensils. Mesopotamia and Egypt exploited copper for creating tools used in farming, wood working, cooking, etc. These were hoes, adzes, saws, combs , pots, dishes, chisels, harpoons, cloak-pins etc. By 6000 BC it was realized that, although copper was not amenable to casting, it could be worked by hammering, chasing, engraving, and cold-rolling. Sumerians used copper sheets to form sculptures over wooden forms and fastened on walls with copper nails or wires set in bitumen.

Imdugud (also Zu or Anzu), the lion-headed eagle; Sumerian metalwork (sheets of copper), Temple of Ninhursag at Tell al-‘Ubaid; ca. 2500 BC

The Roman supply of copper almost entirely came from Cyprus, and so was known as metal of Cyprus, shortened to cyprium, later corrupted to cuprum. Copper is found at many locations as a primary mineral in basaltic lavas and also as reduced form of copper compounds. It occurs in combination with many minerals, such as chalcocite, chalcopyrite, bornite, cuprite, malachite, and azurite. It is an extremely ductile and malleable metal with high tensile strength. It is an excellent conductor of heat and electric. It is a very noble metal and by acting as a cathode can corrode other contagious metals except stainless steel. It is resistant to most acids and sea water.

Bronze decoration

A Copper alloy with tin is known as bronze. Bronze is a stronger alloy, and harder than both the pure metals. Bronze can be cast. A copper with zinc is called Brass. It was also known that by hammering the copper became hardened, ideal for creation hard edged tools. Copper and its alloys, bronze and brass, mark the first science revolution of man. However, relative scarcity of tin in many regions of the world did not allow use Bronze equally everywhere. Tin-based bronzes were preferred due to the hazard of arsenic poisoning from fumes produced by the oxidation of arsenic-containing minerals. Copper-arsenic alloys, of superior properties to copper in both cast and wrought form, were produced in many regions. Arsenic contents varied from 1 to 7 percent, with up to 3 percent tin. In many civilizations the production of pure copper, arsenical copper, and tin bronze continued together for some time.

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STONE CRAFT

Post 464 –by Gautam Shah

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Stone craft consists of many distinct trades, like quarrying, handling-transporting, sizing, cutting, dressing, finishing and masonry work. The first stone craft was using the stone to make tools for working with materials. A right choice of stone quality and appropriate size-shape were important then, and continue to be so today.

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Stone is used for many different purposes.

  1. as industrial raw materials for minerals,
  2. as a constituent material in various composites,
  3. in buildings, for masonry, flooring and applique work,
  4. as an art and craft material.

Paulnabrone

Strength of a stone is checked for following types of stresses:

Compressive stresses, tend to decrease the volume of the material, causing breaks with a shattering effect.

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Tensile stresses, produce cracks and fissures, and torsion (or twisting). Generally, fine-grained rocks are stronger than coarse grained. Rocks with interlocking between the crystals are stronger than rocks with poor interlocking. Stratified rocks have poor strength along the plane or strata. Stratified rocks as a rule have lower strength than igneous and non-stratified homogeneous rocks.

Shear stresses, which move one part of a stone with respect to another, under certain conditions, inducing a permanent change of shape. These are best avoided by appropriate angle of extraction and cut, by careful orientation during coursing a masonry.

Cracks_at_Sunrise-on-Sea,_Eastern_Cape

Torsional stresses are important for structures of stones such as piers. Heat induced stresses were once critical for structures like fire places and hearths, but optional materials have obviated that as the criteria of design.

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The general requirements for stones used in Buildings can be summarized as follows:

■ Sound, uniform rock material.

■ Presence of rifts to facilitate workability by hand tools.

■ Porosity advantageous for cementing, provided it does not decrease the resistance to weathering.

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■ Inherent chemical stability to prevent fluorescence.

■ High strength (as required in certain cases).

■ Low specific gravity (necessary for easier handling and in light weight structures).

■ High abrasion resistance (an important factor for flooring, steps).

Palazzo dei diamanti, facciata principale. Wikipedia Image by Nicolò Musmeci

Masonry walls of stones require specific methods of construction such as:

1 Heaviest and thickest of pieces should be used for lower courses.

2 Small pieces of stones should not be used on outer face.

3 Best flat face with a smallest area should form the wall face.

4 Each stone must rest on a flat surface, if required flat face should be achieved preferably by dressing of the stone, by bedding material or mortar, or by use of splinters and wedges.

5 Wedges should be placed with their wider face on the inside and narrower face on the outside.

6 All loose particles, cleavages, layers should be removed before using a stone.

7 Joints must be staggered.

Palais du Luxembourg Bossage

8 In case of very thick walls, if more than two stones form a width, several full width stone should be employed for keying.

9 For all walls especially random masonry, the corners should be made of long rectangular stones of even thickness (preferably dressed).

Opus Reticulatum Pompeii Roman stone facing pattern Wikipedia Image by Jensens

10 Stratified stone materials should be used for compressive loads to occur across the section or strata.

11 For tension bearing areas stratified and sedimentary stone material should be avoided.

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ART COATINGS

Post 432 – by Gautam Shah

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Lascaux2

Coatings are thin surface finishing techniques. A thin film is achieved by using a material that is in a liquid state or is convertible into a liquid phase. A coating may or may not have a colourant, but on drying achieves various degrees of transparencies. Coatings are applied to entities to alter the appearance, improve the tangibility and to provide a protective cover. Historically, however, coatings have been used for illustration and decorative effects.

The discovery of mixing dishes suggests that liquid pigment mixed with fat was also used and smeared with the hand. The subtle tonal gradations of colour on animals painted in the Altamira and Lascaux caves appear to have been dabbed in two stages with fur pads, natural variations on the rock surface were exploited to create the effects of volume.

Sleeping_Antelope_Tin_Taghirt

The simplest way of marking cave walls was to make finger-traces in the soft layer of clay covering the rock. Lime stone walls were engraved and filled in with iron oxide (hematite, or ochre), or the black pigment as manganese or charcoal. These materials were usually available locally. Analyses of pigments, reveal the use of extenders such as talc or feldspar, to increase the bulk of pigments. It also shows traces of animal and plant oils, used for binding. The pigment in paste form was applied with fingers, and also tools like animal-hair brushes or crushed twigs. Lumps of pigment discovered on cave floors may have been used as crayons, but since they do not mark the rock well, they were more likely to be sources of powder. Colour was often sprayed, from the mouth or through a tube. A network of ladder, supports and scaffolding was used to reach the ceilings and upper portions of walls. Light was provided by hearths, or portable burning torches.

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Primitive coatings were daubing of clays, minerals, charcoal, lamp blacks often mixed with mediums such as water, tallow, vegetable excretion and juices, urine, blood, bitumen. Binding mediums were employed to fix the mineral or colourant particles on the surface. Some of the binding mediums were evaporative and worked only as a `leveller’ for particulate matter. By 6000 BC, in China, calcined (fired) mixtures of inorganic compounds and organic pigments and binding mediums (vehicles) were prepared from gum arabic, egg white, gelatin, and beeswax.

Some oily mediums though superior in fixing and longer lasting, but collected dust on aging. Oil mediums became darker in colour due to oxidation, or just peeled off. Some of the mediums were destroyed due to fungus and algae. Later little more complex substances such as starches of rice and maize, pine wood extracts, egg albumin, bees wax, hydrated limes, gypsum, etc. were used.

PREHISTORIC ART FORMS

There are basic TWO sets of Arts. Fixed arts are built-forms, wall murals and architectural embellishments. These could have been part of either exterior and interior environments. Portable arts, comprise of objects or artefacts. These usually remained in protected environments. Fixed arts were largely painted and scratched or engraved, but portable arts had, at least in initial periods, natural finishes by way of selection and production processes.

Venus_vom_Hohlen_Fels_Original_frontal

Portable arts consist of wide variety of object forms and material combinations. Compared to the fixed Arts the objects are smaller in size. The portable objects show all, the surface treatments, embellishments and coating applications. The objects of this category show greater integration of all the three interventions and greater detail or involvement. Large number and wide variety of objects have been preserved and recovered even from regions where Fixed Arts entities have not survived. Portable arts’ objects are smaller and personal hobby or a family craft creation. The colour and surface quality were matter of choice or discoveries through innovation in production.

Paulnabrone

Fixed Arts entities that have survived are surface treatments or renderings through show painting, scratching, engraving and daubing methods. On the other hand, the surviving built-forms, if considered as art-forms, represent technological milestones of material handling, supporting and construction planning. Fixed arts were large scale or important societal activities, involving entire community by way of voluntary participation or forced labour. The involvement of the community was for seasonal or occasional rituals. The leader, conductor or priest of the ritual and the team were the select few experts who initiated and updated the (art) entities over and over again. Such art-forms indicate occupation or interventions of several generations, as much as for more than 300 years.

Bradshaw rock paintings

Portable Art objects are incidental that is the availability, shape, size, colours, texture, etc. define the range of treatments. Many times the purpose it will serve evolves during the process of treatments. Such objects show material combinations. many different finishes were achieved, by change of forms and exploiting the tools. Material processes like heating, singeing, sintering, baking, beating, shaping, cutting, chopping, grinding, drilling, etc., were also used in farming and cooking. It was one seamless manner of learning.

Venus_of_Brassempouy

The materials were stones, precious stones, metal nodules, mineral and other colourants, woods, grasses, twigs, hides, leathers, skins, furs, hairs, shells, teeth, horns, bones, ivory, raw clay objects, baked clay ceramics, seeds, fruits, etc.

The objects formed were totems, body adornments, tools, implements, ritual and burial objects, cooking utilities, toys for children, amenities and dwelling embellishments.

Collier_de_Penne

These were exchanged, gifted to others or offered in rituals. The objects began to have consistent expressions. The varied metaphors, passing from one generation to other, ultimately became abstract. Coins, plaques, seals, etc. represent multiple conversions of expressions like a language.

Ggantija_Temples,_Xaghra,_Gozo

Fixed Art objects like built-forms, though functional utilities were built for community and for political purposes.

The public use entities were irrigation facilities, forest clearance, dykes, bridges, walks or passages, drinking water resources, community surround structures, security amenities and storage arrangements. These were not ‘decorative arts’ but symbolized technological innovations. Some like burial stones and dolmen had items of personalization.

Cave_Paintings_Bhembetika_(22)e

Fixed Arts objects like wall arts show skills of surface preparation, rendering or painting and surface finishing. These creations also show art of surface preparation by way of grinding, etching, daubing, engraving and colourant application. Wall-arts exist in odd narrow corners, at very high elevations, tall ceilings, day time dark corners and in nearly inaccessible places. The effort must have required support structures, bridges, scaffolds, illumination and ancillary works to protect the creations from moisture.

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VELVET – Fabric of Luxury

Post 385 – by Gautam Shah 

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Velvet sleeves Portrait of Sir Thomas More (ART by Hans Holbein (1498–1543)). Oak, 74.2 × 59 cm. Frick Collection, New York

Piled weaves are used to create textured fabrics. The characteristic texture over the surface of fabric is formed of Tuft or, loops that are cut or uncut. The piles are made from either or both warp, and web yarns. Corduroy, Velvets, Velveteen, Valour, Plushes are such piled fabric constructions. Few other materials, such as the suede, flocked fibres, have Velvet like a feel.

velvet ropes

Velvet is a fabric formed of three elements: ‘a structural warp, a structural weft and a non structural or supplementary warp’. There are two types of looms in which pile-velvet were produced. On a regular velvet loom, double layered fabric is woven, with piles interlacing both layers. After weaving the fabric layers are sheared and separated into two single cloths. The inner faces of the fabrics have cut piles. On a wire loom the piles are formed through looping the yarns over the wire. After withdrawing the holding wire a knife cuts the loop, producing the cut pile. In another option the piles are not cut. The uncut piles have own texture and feel. Often there are dual constructions where one set of warp and web fibres form a plain weave base, and another set of alternate web or warp fibres create piles. The piles may be cut or left uncut as loops.

Blue velvet dress of Diana, Princess of Wales http://www.reagan.utexas.edu/archives/photographs/vips.html

Velvet weaving originated somewhere on the far east side of the silk route. From here it must have been taken by the Arabs to Europe. The Persian and Hindi (India) word for velvet is Makhmal, literally meaning silky or smooth feel. Mughal and Safavid (Iranian) weavers not only exploited the properties of velvet but enriched it with gold and silver. They also dyed the fabric to dark and deep colours. In Europe, during 12th C. velvet found a base in Italian towns of Lucca, Sicily and Florence.

Throne chair of Stanislaus Augustus Warsaw

The cut-pile method of fabric surface forming is used in two other types of fabrics: namely, Velveteens and Valours. Velveteen is usually made of cotton or its blends. It has shorter and stiffer pile that lies flat. It is sturdy and durable but has poorer draping, and lesser sheen. It is also less denser and so used as craft or toy making fabric. Velvet is a very ancient fabric, whereas velveteen is of recent making. Velour is often called a stretch fabric. It is used as stretching over furnishing fabric for shaping purposes.

Velvet curtain – Tableau curtain from inside of the scene Wikipedia Image by Sémhur

Crushed velvet is produced by manipulating the fabric whilst it is wet. The manipulations include twisting, crushing, brushing, creasing and embossing. Creases and folds in the fabric can flatten the pile or make it lumpy. Devore velvet is a fabric treated with a caustic solution as a pattern, to dissolve the piles in select sections. Embossed velvet is created by heat treatment with a patterned roller. Panne velvet is a result of treatment that forces piles to lie in particular direction.

Devore velvet -burn-out sections on velvet Wikipedia Image by Libby norman

Velvet fabrics due to the one-directional weave and piles show a characteristic nap. The nap affects the colour perception from length and width sides. Due to the nap, the fabric feels smoother in one direction than the other. It is very necessary to align or orient the nap consistently for all uses.

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Velvet, a piled fabric consumes lots of silk, and so is very costly. It is a light density and fragile material. Velvet is a method of fabric formation, and so can be used with many other fibres, such as cotton, rayons, acetate, polyesters, etc. Each fiber types or combination provides a different quality of velvet fabric. But it is the surface-feel that makes the fabric soft, smooth, elegant, cool to the skin and drape-able.

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Silk velvet was a highly prized fabric, identified with wealth, power and prestige. Synthetic velvets made from rayon and acetate are cheaper but heavier and do not drape well. All types of velvets can be dyed with saturated deep colours, due to its unique fibrous surface.

Jewel box lining

Velvets are used in everything dresses, gowns, horse carriages, furniture, clothes, jackets, handbags, scarves, skirts and blouses, drape and wall coverings. Mughal used it for making Shamiana (tents) for parties. Velvets have been used stage curtains. Velvet fabrics are opaque, and due this reasons are used as background for exhibit of art-pieces shadowboxes, jewellery boxes, photo boxes and lining the coffins.

Indian_mojari,_19th_century,_red_velvet_with_gold_embroidery_and_sequins_-_Bata_Shoe_Museum_-_DSC00132

Diwan i Khas Red Fort Delhi Shamianas

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ROSEWOOD

Post 376 – by Gautam Shah 

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640px-Topvieuw_of_a_tambura_bridgeRosewood refers to any number of dark red to brown hued woods with darker veins. It is accepted that genuine rosewood belongs to genus Dalbergia. It is known as Brazilian Rosewood, and also as Bahia Rosewood. Its popular name rose-wood derives from the long lasting strong sweet smell and reddish colour. The woods of Dalbergia are now listed as endangered species, and its felling and trading, are banned. The Dalbergia has many subspecies such as Dalbergia nigra, Dalbergia maritima (Madagascar rosewood known as bois de rose), Dalbergia latifolia (East Indian Rosewood or sonokeling wood), Dalbergia oliveri (S.E. Asia Rosewood) and Dalbergia sissoo (also known as Indian rosewood, sissoo or sisam).

 

RosewoodPiecesRosewood has become a generic or representative name for hard dark reddish-purple to brownish coloured woods of tropical regions. No agency regulates, the use of word ‘rosewood, and anyone can use it freely. So we have ‘rosewoods’ of Brazil, Honduras, Jamaica, Africa, Burma, Thailand, China, Nepal and India, differently named as Indian rosewood, African rosewood, and Burmese rosewood or Amboyna wood. Not all woods of genus Dalbergia provide rosewoods. Other woods of in the same family include African Blackwood, Cocobolo, Kingwood, Tulipwood and Australian Rose Mahogany (Dysoxylum fraserianum).

 

Low-back_armchair,_China,_late_Ming_to_Qing_dynasty,_late_16th-18th_century_AD,_huanghuali_rosewood_-_Arthur_M._Sackler_Gallery_-_DSC05918

587px-Ming_Dynasty_Wardrobe

Rosewood has denser grain near the core, but its outer sapwood is soft and porous. Rosewood trunks are very large, but squared logs or planks are rarely cut because before the tree reaches maturity, the heartwood begins to decay, making it faulty and hollow at the center.

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Rosewood is strong and durable than teak. Rosewood is dense so pre-drilling or hole punching is advisable before nailing or screwing. Working with rosewood can dull cutting blades and put a heavy load on power tools. Some varieties of rosewoods have oily grain, which do not allow oil varnish coating or adhesive joining. Rosewood items must be finished with Nitro cellulose lacquer or waxed with little oil. Its lighter colour grains are stained with spirit soluble waxoline red dye (similar to dark tan show polish).

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Hans Wegner chair in Pompidou, Paris

All rosewoods have dense grain, so take good polish and retain it for long period. Rosewoods are considered ideal material for tool handles (chisels, screw drivers, hammers) door-window handles, wood pegs for joinery, paper weights, scales, rulers, decorative table pieces, agriculture implement, diamond polishing handles, weaving shuttles, silk yarn bobbins, chess sets, musical instruments, billiard cues, weapon handles etc. Rosewood shavings and sanding dust are added to hair-oils as a natural dye. Rosewood veneers and borders are highly valued items. Rosewood allows very thin sections for furniture items such as chairs, teepoys, tables, etc.

Sisam wood

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INDIAN ROSEWOOD

In India best rosewood is called sisam, and is found almost everywhere. Mysore or Karnataka rosewood is of a deep red purple colour with black streaks. Dangs in Gujarat, MP, Nepal border areas with Bihar and UP, and Haryana, provide rosewood of ruddy brown to purplish-brown colour. India padauk or narra wood is usually of red or rose colour, often variegated with yellow, and is hard and heavy. Narra wood is known also as Burmese rosewood, Andaman redwood, and kiabooca wood. A Jacaranda is a tree of Brazil origin with timber of purple to blackish colour, often stained to match sisam for veneer making.

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Sisam in India (or shisham) is known by other names: aguru (Sanskrit), Bombay Rosewood (English), Dalbergia (Arabic), nakku katti (Tamil Nadu), ostindisches Rosenholz, pradu-khaek, pradu-khaek, shinshapa (Sanskrit), shisham (Hindi), shishu (Bengali), shisu (Bengali), sisam (Hindi), sisham (Nepali), sissai (Hindi), sissau (Nepali), sisso (English), sisso (Tamil), sissoo (English), sissoo (Arabic), sissoo (Hindi), sissu (Hindi), sisu (Bengali), sisu (Spanish), sisuitti (Tamil), skuva, sonoswaseso (Javanese), tali, yette (Tamil).

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