BLOGS LINKS about PERCEPTION

Post 652 -by Gautam Shah

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These are my select few 91+ blogs (out of nearly 850 placed on my 4 blog sites) written over last 4 years, now compiled under a common theme ‘Space Perception’ with following sub sections.

      0  New series of Lectures (Four) on Perception

  1. SPACE PERCEPTION
  2. ILLUMINATION
  3. MOVEMENT, BALANCE
  4. OPENINGS SYSTEMS
  5. GLASS
  6. GRILLS, TRELLIS, CURTAINS
  7. SOUND and NON VISUAL
  8. OBJECTS, SURFACES, COLOURS, PATTERNS
  9. REALITY, MAKE-BELIEVE

 

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0  New series of Lectures (Four) on Perception

0.1 SOME SOUND BITES -Space Perception -I

https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2018/02/12/some-sound-bites-space-perception-i/

0.2 STRATIFICATION of VISION

https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2018/03/02/stratification-of-vision0.2 /

0.3 PERCEPTION of SPATIAL FIELDS -ILLUMINATION

https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2018/03/11/perception-of-spatial-fields-illumination/

0.4 MULTI NODAL PERCEPTIONS of OBJECTS in SPACE

https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2018/05/14/multi-nodal-perceptions-of-objects-in-space/

 

 

1 SPACE PERCEPTION

1.1 PROCESS of PERCEPTION

1.2 PROCESS of PERCEPTION part-I

1.3 SPACE PERCEPTION -through seeing, hearing and touching

1.4 SPACE PERCEPTION – Issues for Design -4

1.5 SPACE PERCEPTION

1.6 SPATIAL DEFINITIONS

1.7 SENSING OBJECTS BEYOND THEIR SIZE MEASURES

1.8 SPATIAL DEFINITIONS

1.9 SPATIAL DISTANCING and BEHAVIOUR

1.10 DISTANCING in SPACE

1.11 SPACES SIZES and SHAPES

1.12 SMALL SPACES and LARGE SPACES

1.13 REACH in SPACE

Scaffold Building Manhattan New York City Taxi

2 ILLUMINATION

2.1 CONTRAST EFFECT – PERCEPTION

2.2 PERCEPTION of SPATIAL FIELDS -ILLUMINATION

2.3 DAYLIGHTING

2.4 DAY-LIGHTING – in Interior Spaces

2.5 DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS for DAYLIGHTING

2.6 SPACE PERCEPTION and ILLUMINATION

2.7 DAYTIME INTERIOR ILLUMINATION -REALITY and PERCEPTION

2.8 INTERIOR ILLUMINATION through DOORS

2.9 WINDOW LOCATION and NATURAL LIGHTING

2.10 LE CORBUSIER and ILLUMINATION

2.11 COMPARING WINDOWS of FLW, LC and Mies

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3 MOVEMENT, BALANCE

3.1 MOVEMENT and BALANCE – Issues for Design -5

3.2 PERCEPTION of BALANCE and MOVEMENT

3.3 BALANCE in DESIGN – Part 1

3.4 BALANCE in DESIGN – Part 2

3.5 VISUAL PERCEPTION of MOVEMENTS

3.6 PERCEPTION through SCALES and CONVERSIONS -Issues or Design -3 

Landscape

4 OPENINGS SYSTEMS

4.1 LEVELS of OPENINGS

4.2 DESIGNING OPENINGS

4.3 CLASSICAL WINDOW FORMS

4.4 ARCHITECTURAL WINDOWS and VISION in-out

4.5 ARCHITECTURAL WINDOWS and the MEANING

4.6 ARCHITECTURAL WINDOWS and MECHANICS of VISION

4.7 MEANING of a WINDOW SILL

4.8 THIRD DIMENSION of OPENINGS

4.9 LANTERNS in ARCHITECTURE

4.10 CLERESTORY OPENINGS

4.11 SKY LIGHTS

4.12 ROOF LIGHTS

4.13 SHOP WINDOWS

4.14 SHOP WINDOWS – SHOP FRONTS – DISPLAY WINDOWS

4.15 FRAMING of OPENINGS

4.16 MASKING of OPENINGS Part -III -Framing

4.17 MASKING of OPENINGS Part -II

4.18 MASKING of OPENINGS Part -I

Eating_Alone

5 GLASS

5.1 GLASS in ARCHITECTURE -1

5.2 GLASS and PERCEPTION

5.3 GLASS in WINDOWS – Part • I

5.4 GLASS in WINDOWS – Part • II

5.5 COLOURED GLASS

Fixing Metallic Transparency Glass Front Metal6 GRILLS, TRELLIS, CURTAINS

6.1 CONTEXT -Issues for Design -12

6.2 ROOFS 3 -Skyline and Silhouette

6.3 HOLISM and DESIGN

6.4 TRELLIS

6.5 GRILLS

6.6 CURTAINS

6.7 TRANSLUCENCY for CURTAINS

6.8 SHEER FABRICS and CURTAINS

6.9 SHEER FABRICS and CURTAINS-2

6.10 NON SILK SHEER FABRICS and CURTAINS

6.11 WEIGHT and TRANSLUCENCY of fabrics for curtains

6.12 SHEER FABRICS

Religious Kneeling Worship Pray Prayer Church

7 SOUND and NON VISUAL

7.1 SOUND

7.2 SOUND, SPACE and PERCEPTION

7.3 PERCEPTION of SOUND and SPACES

7.4 SPACE and SOUND REVERBERATION

7.5 SOUND and NOISE MANAGEMENT

7.6 HEARING and interior spaces

7.7 ACOUSTICS in SMALL SPACES

7.8 SOUND and SMALL SPACES

7.9 SPACE PLANNING and NON VISUAL CUES

7.10 NON VISUAL LANGUAGE -Issues for Design -6

7.11 LANGUAGE EXPRESSION and SOUND PERCEPTION

wuzhen-1643267_6408 OBJECTS, SURFACES, COLOURS, PATTERNS

8.1 OBJECTS in SPATIAL FIELDS -Issues for Design -14

8.2 COLOURS -Perception and Expression

8.3 COLOURS and BUILDINGS

8.4 FLOORINGS

8.5 FLOORING COLOUR

8.6 FLOORINGS IN INTERIOR SPACES

8.7 PERCEPTION of SURFACE FINISHES

8.8 GLOSS

8.9 TEXTURES and MATERIALS

8.10 JOINTS in SURFACE FINISHES

8.11 MOSAICS

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9 REALITY, MAKE-BELIEVE

9.1 SOLIDS and VOIDS -issues for Design -13

9.2 AUGMENTED REALITY

9.3 SPACES and REALITY

9.4 MAKE-BELIEVE in INTERIOR DESIGN

 

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SOUND, SPACE and PERCEPTION

Post -by Gautam Shah

The tonal quality of spoken language or sound is determined by many factors like social history and ethnic affinity. It is also formed by dominant building forms, materials and the physical environment factors like terrain, topography, (plains, coastal, valleys, lake fronts, forest, deserts). The quality of speech-sound is acutely affected by the environment one dwells in or aspires to be with.

 

There is a saying in Gujarat, India that every 20/25 km Speech varies. Such ‘Socio-linguistics’, can happen syntactically, lexically, and phonologically. The Phonology relates to the systems of phonemes or the organization of sounds in a language.

 

People (fishermen) who stay close to a sea coast are affected by the continuous splashing sound of waves. Similarly villagers staying in a valley often bear the echoing effect of the mountain range, whereas in plain desert land there is complete absence of bouncing sounds. People living on a very busy-noisy street have to talk louder and that habit remains with them for a very long time.

 

True colour of human speech comes about by intra vowel-consonants pauses, vowel and consonant utterance lengths and preferred frequency combinations, intra word pauses, phrasing, etc. When a language is spoken in different terrains each, creates its own variants. Human speech variants develop according to the environment one resides, and specifically how one listens to own speech sounds. This is perhaps the reason why children with deficient hearing capacity often have poor speech formation.

 

It is also true that people tend to accept the speech sound they can make as the perfect one, which may not be true. Teachers have better speech quality, as they have more opportunities to improvise. Similarly an American child or for that matter any child of a well to do family, bred in media culture is better attuned to a style of talking that is correct for good projection. Next generation of children are going to be more articulate than their parents or other non media children.

 

Speech intelligibility is a function of space. Space not only defines how the speech will be listened to, but also how the speaker or musician will improvise the output.

 

In Indian classical music concerts (vocal and instrumental) we have seen masters tuning the musical instruments, drums on stage, in front of the audience. This is often irritating to many, but in reality the musician is attuning the sound for that space and environment (moisture, temperature and air movement currents). The Alap in Indian music, the first rendering that is without the drum beats, is also attuning for the space and environment. Most Western concerts or Pop singers spend hours on the ground testing position of the speakers, their location and pitch of a sound etc. to attune to the site conditions.

 

Most experienced speakers and stage actors have the capacity to instantly modulate their output according to the quality of space. For example, if the background noise is high, the speaker will raise the voice and change the tonal quality (change the range of frequency to over come masking) or if there is a longer reverberation, the pauses between words are widened. Speakers also face the section of crowd they want the message to sink in. In group discussions, an experienced person automatically shifts to a ‘sound’ advantageous position. Seasoned actors during the rehearsals pick the nuances of stage positions and body posture to deliver an effective dialogue.

 

Effective sound delivery is closely related to how the speaker is perceived. For example on non visual space like the Radio or telephone a straight into the mike creates a steady delivery of sound, but a moving speaker (or the mike) carries the impression of a non-sincere person. Most of the TV anchors are taught to speak without moving their head or body. There was a time when the surroundings or space mattered a lot on the quality of Sound being carried, however, today the microphones can eliminate the background noise and also do some degree of micro balancing to eliminate the differences caused by shifting speaker or singer.

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PERCEPTION of SOUND and SPACES

 

 

Most experienced speakers, stage actors and musicians (vocal and instrument players) have an innate or learned capacity to improvise their output immediately on encountering a new space. They readjust -their output according to the audio response from the nature of space.

 

The Nature of Space is determined by several objective and Subjective factors.

 

The objective factors are the size, scale, shape and form (hard vs soft surfaces) of the architectural space. Other objective factors include degree of echoes or reverberation in the space, quality of public address system, location and direction of the speaker or musician, etc. The occupancy or crowding in the space, and the nature of garments, furniture and furnishings also affects the perception of sound. The background noise seeping to the speaker or performer’s area and the audience, or to the listener (in small gatherings) could be very different. This means that a performer may not perceive the audience or listener’s environment. Only way to sense this is through the recognition of behavioural responses. Experienced speaker or performer raises the voice and change the tonal quality, and if there is a longer reverberation, the pauses are widened and delivery stretched in time.

 

Speaker or performer sense the space and focus the address to that part of the audience, where Sound delivery is perceived to be inadequate. The performer use enlarged body language and dress movements to supplement the Sound.

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