LIST of BLOGS on DESIGN PRACTICE

.

Post 637 –by Gautam Shah

This is a random selection of BLOGS on Design Practice (Professional Practice) from several of my blogs on the subject.

4884992_a5be18f6aa_z

Flickr Image by Denis Jacquerye

  • INTERIOR DESIGN and CLIENTS>>

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2015/05/05/interior-design-and-clients/

  • CLIENT and DESIGN PROFESSIONAL -Relationship >>

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2015/01/14/client-and-design-professional-relationship/

  • FEES NEGOTIATIONS WITH A CLIENT >>

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2015/01/02/fees-negotiations-with-a-client/

  • PROFILING CLIENTS >>

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2014/12/02/profiling-clients/

  • DETERMINATION of PROFESSIONAL FEES >>

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2015/03/10/determination-of-professional-fees/

  • CONTRACT and ENFORCEMENT >>

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2014/11/02/contract-and-enforcement/

  • A PROFESSIONAL and PROFESSIONAL BEHAVIOUR >>

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2014/09/27/a-professional-and-professional-behaviour/

  • Differentiating COST from VALUE -Interior Design Practice >>

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2014/06/14/differentiating-cost-from-value-interior-design-practice/

  • DESIGNERS DILEMMA – RIGHT FEES >>

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2014/06/13/designers-dilemma-right-fees/

  • DATA for PROFESSIONALS >>

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2014/05/25/data-for-professionals/

  • PROJECT REPORT OR PROJECT PROFILE REPORT >>

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2014/04/01/project-report-or-project-profile-report/

  • INTERIOR DESIGNER – the role

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2015/02/16/interior-designer-the-role/

  • QUALITY CONSCIENCE and COMPLIANCE in DESIGN PRACTICE

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2016/04/12/quality-conscience-and-compliance-in-design-practice/

  • INTERIOR DESIGN PRACTICE > FEES

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2015/12/15/interior-design-practice-fees/

  • MANAGING FEES -for Building Design practices PART – III

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2015/08/21/managing-fees-for-building-design-practices-part-iii/

  • MANAGING FEES -for Building Design practices PART – IV

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2015/09/05/managing-fees-for-building-design-practices-part-iv/

  • MANAGING FEES -for Building Design practices PART – II

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2015/08/15/managing-fees-for-building-design-practices-part-ii/

  • MANAGING FEES -for Building Design practices PART – I

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2015/07/20/managing-fees-for-building-design-practices-part-i/

  • PROFESSIONAL FEES

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2015/07/16/professional-fees/

  • SPECIFICATIONS CONTENTS (Design Practice)

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2015/03/31/specifications-contents-design-practice/

  • DESIGN PRACTICES

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2014/11/15/design-practices/

  • DESIGN PRACTICE and CONSCIENCE

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2014/11/11/design-practice-and-conscience/

  • WRITING SPECIFICATIONS in DESIGN PRACTICE

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2014/09/17/writing-specifications-in-design-practice/

  • COMMITTING a CLIENT for JOB

https://interiordesignassist.wordpress.com/2015/08/03/committing-a-client-for-job/

yellow-metal-design-decoration

Pexels Image by Kaboompics // Karolina > http://www.kaboompics.com/

A set of articles on DESIGN IMPLEMENTATION PROCESSES that were offered as PG Level course are also available at >

.

01 Organizations
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/08/08/organizations-1/

02 Essentials of Design Organizations
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/08/11/essentials-of-organizations-02/

03 Design Organizations
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/08/14/design-organizations-03/

04 Projects of Design
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/08/22/projects-of-design-04/

05 Job or Assignment Handling in Design Organizations
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/08/30/jobs-or-assignment-handling-in-design-organizations-05/

06 Deliverables from Design Organizations
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/08/23/deliverables-from-design-organizations-06/

07 Dealing with a Client in a Design Organization
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/09/06/dealing-with-a-client-in-a-design-organization-7/

08 Specifications
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/07/31/specifications-08/

09 History of Specifications
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/08/01/history-of-specifications-09/

10 Standards
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/08/06/standards-10/

11 Liabilities
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/11/28/liabilities-11-design-implementation-processes/

12 Bureau of Indian Standards BIS
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/10/03/bureau-of-indian-standards-bis-12/

13 International Standards Organization ISO
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/10/11/international-standards-organization-iso-13/

14 ISO 9000 and other Management Standards
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/10/09/iso-9000-and-other-management-standards-14/

15 Quality for Designers
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/09/13/quality-for-designers-15/

16 Quality Conscience
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/09/16/quality-conscience-16/

17 Consumerism
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/08/16/consumerism-for-designers-17/

18 Human Resources
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/10/21/human-resources-18-design-implementation-processes/

19 Leadership in Design Organizations
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/09/19/leadership-in-design-organizations-19/

20 Data, Information and Knowledge
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/10/29/data-information-and-knowledge-20-design-implementation-processes/

21 Design Processes 21-1 to 21-4
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/09/24/design-processes-21-1-design-handling/

22 Decision Making and Problem Solving
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/10/16/decision-making-and-problem-solving-22-design-implementation-processes/

23 Systems Thinking
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/10/22/systems-thinking-23-design-implementation-processes/

24 Risk Management
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/10/23/risk-management-24-design-implementation-processes/

25 Guarantees and Warranties
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/11/30/guarantees-and-warranties-25-design-implementation-processes/

26 Finance
https://designacademics.wordpress.com/2016/11/14/finance-26-design-implementation-processes/

.

Advertisements

MANAGING FEES -for Building Design practices PART – IV

Post 511  by Gautam Shah

.

Town_Hall_Shimla_Restoration_01

Building Design firms often provide many different design services, such as Architecture, Interior Design, Structure, Interiors, Landscape, etc. And within these broad range of groups, the actual services may relate to New constructions, Renovations, Alterations, Extensions, valuation and project assessment, project feasibility reports, etc. The projects, when handled simultaneously rarely remain within the confines of well-documented definitions. Like some pre-emptive work for interior or landscape design will occur in the architectural scheme. And when the post building construction, other services are prematurely terminated, the ‘pre-emptive’ work will not get paid.

Serpentine BP Pedestrian Bridge by architect Frank Gehry’s Buckingham Wikipedia image by Author Torsodog

These services occur in different schedules, and their scopes are based on very different criteria. Building design fees are chiefly collected on the basis of floor spread or footprint, except in few countries where it may be based on hours spent on it. The floor spread based varies with the type of project. Fees charged for Architectural projects include the construction cost (built-up coast) + some extra for site development design works. Similarly structural design fees are computed on the construction costs, but that may be a small part, in comparison to costs of site development works like land contouring, retaining walls and other support entities. Interior Design fees cannot always be calculated on the basis of carpet area, as lot of materials and objects are retained or reused.

Maggie’s Care Centre, Glasgow, Scotland Wikipedia – Flickr image by Author scarpadog (Jon-Marc Creaney)

In a group or associated practices the savings occur from the seamless handling of a project. This occurs when common entities are detailed or specified just once. Like for Landscape design site structures (pavings, curbs, retaining walls, water-body formations) are specified with architectural details. Electrical layout for architecture and Interior design is nearly identical.

Image Attribution: Shakespeare at English Wikipedia

Yet, in all these, the most important issue, vis a vis a client that comes through is, What should be, and How to determine the Cost of the job? The term Total Cost of Job nominally means to include all the costs of actually executing the designed job, similar costs of inputs from other design consultants or agencies, and the cost of all the peripheral work executed on the site through or by owners themselves or their agents, during the Currency period of the Design Services. The total Cost of Job will also include the estimated value of the work being preserved or maintained on the site.

interior-of-maintenance-shop Public Domain images by Hillebrand Steve, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

At the start of a design project, the total cost of the job, is not available. As a result some notional figure is determined, to bill the first installment of fees or a lump-sum figure is used for first bill. This figure is determined on the basis of total cost of the job, but more importantly the intellectual rights of design formation. To determine the cost of a job, spread of the job or the built-up area is very useful. Structural engineers often base the fees on RCC (or structural) component of the project or a percentage of fees payable to the architect. Interior designers base their fees on Carpet area, but more surely on Interior Design intervention area, which is more rational or realistic. In spite of this in a group or associated practices it becomes difficult to derive a common fee’s formula.

.

MANAGING FEES -for Building Design practices PART – III

Post 502  by Gautam Shah

.

2017-08-15-09-57-57-1000x666

drawing-2284505_640

Design fees are based on many factors or considerations. One of the important elements is the complexity of the job, which in turn is reflected in Design floor spread or area of work. This is now called expected area of design intervention. It can include every thing that is intensively and intentionally to be impacted by design. In case of architecture or interior design it includes all design affectations inside and outside the built form. For this purpose your design brief presented to a client becomes the Bench Mark. But one must also equate the design brief with a structure for fees’ computation.

 

 

1453895

640px-Small_group_conversation_at_a_Gurteen_Knowledge_CafeFor all designers the safest bet is to mention a minimum chargeable fee with a rider that it relates to One site, One Project, One Client and One occasion or interaction. The minium chargeable fee, must be interpreted as the retaining amount (services of a designer). Mention of one occasion or interaction is necessary as some clients after paying the retaining amount go into sleep-mode lasting an indeterminate period. It is necessary to state what design services a client can expect on payment of retaining amounts. This may include one or few meetings for discussions of design brief, including scope of design services, collection and verification of the site related documents, a site visit, or submission of a design scheme.

If minimum chargeable amount (or retaining amount) covers and obligates you to submit a schematic design, than following cares are necessary. Schematic design must never be submitted in digitally manipulable form, such as the CAD-based files. One may however, submit image files like in pdf, jpg, or similar format. Smart designers avoid creating very exactly scaled proposals.

financialcontrol-work-official

First fee is a retainer fee > Pic through Flickr by David Goehring

The schematic or preliminary sketch design is likely to go into hyperbole for showing the possibilities of design interventions. The design elements not only spread as built-forms, but include surroundings’ treatments. This is often equated as a promise against the clients’ estimate or the perception of the budget. This means, one need resubmit a redefined version (usually truncated and very rarely an expanded one ) of schematic drawings, as soon as project is shaped (that is fees are set). At this stage it would be wiser to define and graphically indicate the extent and nature of Design interventions. It could also include the Requested Design (Client’s brief) and Design to be executed. A client should clearly understand the term ‘design to be executed’ will form the basis for fees’ determination. Cancellation of the job or any downward sizing will not affect the ‘basis for fees’.

A_man_negotiating_with_a_cobbler

Caupona Salvius Pompeii customers playing dice

.

DETERMINATION of PROFESSIONAL FEES

DETERMINATION of PROFESSIONAL FEES

Post 360 ⇒   by Gautam Shah 

.

Determination of professional fees is a very difficult exercise. To determine a right fee, a professional is expected to know the following:

  1. What is the VALUE of professional services to the client, and in the society,
  2. What is the COST of providing professional services (cost of input),
  3. Wills there be a surplus (profit) after deducting COST from the VALUE.

Senior professionals have experience, and so can prejudge the value of their professional services. Fresh professionals and even seniors venturing into unknown fields cannot judge the value of their services. They would rather compute the cost of input first, and then add a fixed or a percentage amount, as profit.

Lawyer and clients

Professional fees are very subjective. Fees vary from a professional to professional, from one project to project, and also from one client to another. There are no standards, though there may be traditions in the field. Professionals take on an assignment for a fee, determined by themselves, and sometimes after further negotiating with the clients. Besides fees, a professional also collects: Extras for other services, such as site visits, surveys, additional or optional detailing, special documentation, etc. and applicable taxes.

A professional gets engaged for different types of assignments.

Physical assignments are projects where implementation involves large resource outlays and the cost of the professional input is measurable with the scale of the project.

Denver international airport

Intellectual projects are more intensive on conceptual input or idea. The cost of idea formation is indeterminable and cost executing the extraordinary concept is very small. The results or benefits accruing to the client are great. A client may gain extraordinary advantage by such professional contribution. So fees for intellectual projects are based the value of the professional input (to the client, society, etc.). Such fees need not match with the scale or cost of the project.

Involved projects are of two types: Involvement of the professional and the involution of the client. The client is fascinated by the prestige of the professional and desires personal involvement. Such clients will payout the stipulated fees. Professional involvement depends on many factors: Personal attitude (sincere, commercial), Demands by the client, Nature of the assignment / Competition from others / Client’s readiness to bear the additional costs (of intense involvement) etc.

Marina Project Dubai

■   Cost of a job nominally includes cost of all items that physically constitute a job. These items may be existing and are reformed, reused or acquired afresh. Cost of supplies by third party vendors and contractors are accountable, but items supplied by the clients from the existing stock are difficult to document. Cost of retained, saved-reused structures, antique materials, curios used in a project are not available, instead their values, though not easy to ascertain, are used. On sites where several professionals operate simultaneously, authorship to a creation is disputable.

■    Cost of professional inputs are costs or expenses incurred to conceive, design and plan out a project. It includes cost of data collection, stationary, documentation, presentation, printing, conveyance, staff salaries, cost of management, cost of investments, cost of rents for plants, tools and equipments, etc. It also includes the value of patent ideas, royalties, and taxes.

■   Scale of a project can enlarge or shrink during planning, designing and the execution phase. Even at fixed spread or volume, the costs inflate or deflate according to the economic conditions. But are the fees adjustable, accordingly?

Carsten Höller’s work -a series of corkscrewing tubular metal slides

■   Cost of involvement in the project is as per the agreement on the variety of design services offered and agreed upon, and the scale of the project. Any downward sizing of the project may not automatically reduce the involvement of the professional. Though upward scaling of a project, increases the professional’s work.

.

A PROFESSIONAL and PROFESSIONAL BEHAVIOUR

Post 197 – by Gautam Shah 

.

When a person professes skill for a negotiated compensation and conditions, then the person is called a professional. This is very contrary to a situation where a person gets paid a time bound amount -a salary, for discharge of a skill. Salaried people, however, well skilled, are not considered to be true professionals.

27293114192_ed3d7728b9_z.jpg

A salary, does not reflect the true value, but rather a generalized cost of the skill. Salary is also not linked to a quality assurance or time bound delivery. Salary as an income does not motivate a person to maximize the productivity and creativity.

Professionals can profess skills for their clients. Professional need clients, with specific assignments and certain compensation. Professionals, themselves become clients, when they need technical help, and are willing to compensate someone with appropriate skill.??????????????????

A professional is required to behave professionally with:

  • another professional of the same skill
  • other professional/s but of different skills
  • other individuals who help to carry out the assignments
  • person /persons who retain the professional for the technical services such as the clients.
  • society in general.

clairvoyant-magic-occult-1317173

When a professional deals with another professional, it needs to be examined, if the contact has a professional to client or client to professional context. If not, than the relationship is very predictable. Both the parties profess the same skills and so follow similar norms of behaviour. However, when the context is professional to a client or vice-versa, then one is a retainer and the other is retained one. The relationship is like any other ordinary client and professional relationship.

people-1651512_640

A professional sports-person is one who is no longer an amateur, i.e. one who can be commissioned with a fee, for the skills for a specific situation like a game or a sports event. A crafts-person who produces artefacts in a workshop and later sells it to a connoisseur, is not a professional, as the products were not created as an assignment. On a similar count an artist or a sculptor who creates a work of art and sells it in an exhibition, is also not a professional. A muralist, however, is a professional, as the person is retained for a fee to mount a mural, at a specific location. A chartered accountant working, as a financial executive in a company for a salary, is not a professional, though the membership to a chartered body may endow a status that of a professional. Similarly, a doctor working in a hospital on a salary is not a professional, though he may behave with all the professionalism expected of a true medical professional. A cook, magician, actor, barber and prostitute, are all true professionals, if are retained with a fee for a specific assignment. A salaried ship captain, army General, or a professor, all may show utmost professionalism in their work or duties, yet are not true professionals..

Pankaj Advani Professional sports-person

Pankaj Advani Professional sports-person

Society expects a certain kind of behaviour from a person who is assigned a task for a fee. This unique behaviour or professionalism is set by:

international-conference-1597531_640

1 Person own-self: A professional is always an individual entity, because the individual own-self is the prime originator of professional behaviour. A professional’s behaviour or the professionalism is always judged as an individual.

Larry King Broadcaster

Larry King Broadcaster

2 Professionals themselves (professing similar skills) as a group: Formal codification of behaviour norms for a particular profession excludes the newer peripheral skills. New skills demand slightly different type of behaviour norm. Entrenched practitioners of a profession cannot tolerate the altered or additional behaviour norms required for the new skills. When conditions to become or remain a professional are very formal (written or neatly described), creative individuals feel stifled. They try to reform the existing set-up to cause a change, or step-out to form a new organization. In both cases, the existing organization suffers, or is destroyed.

business-1219868_640

3 Society in general: Over a period of time, the behaviour of all persons in a particular profession becomes so obvious or predictable that, these professionals seem to be directly or indirectly, visibly or invisibly governed by a set of `ethics’, code of conduct, or rules-regulations. All such rules, codes etc. however, can never be formally set, explained, or written. Many are traditions or universally accepted norms.

4 Authority or Government through rule of the law: Unless other conditions are fully or partially met, the rule of law on its own cannot set the professional behaviour and consequently create a professional. The fourth condition, is a matter of legality or rather a necessary evil.

575px-Au_Salon_de_la_rue_des_Moulins_-_Henri_de_Toulouse-Lautrec

.